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The diets to help control seizures have changed drastically in the last few years. The focus has changed from a diet that creates large amounts of ketones to one that maintaines a low blood sugar. Here is a video I made to help you better understand diets for seizure control.

2. Low blood glucose

The focus for seizure control diets has changed from a diet that produces large amounts of ketone bodies to one that weighs a greater importance in having a stable blood glucose level and moderate ketone bodies.

Although you probably won’t be take be taking blood glucose levels regularly it is important to realize how foods affect blood glucose levels. When you choose low GI foods it means that you are choosing foods that will not spike blood glucose levels.


3. Moderate Ketones


Ketones are three water-soluble compounds that are produced as by-products when fatty acids are broken down for energy in the liver and kidney during starvation (or when on a diet mimicking starvation). Two of the three are used as a source of energy in the heart and brain while the third is a waste product excreted from the body.

Pfeifer & Thiele (2005) study on 11 patients noted that the levels of ketones were lower on a LGIT vs classic KD but still higher than the laboratory reference levels of normal.

Unless you are at the point of needing a classic ketogenic diet I recommend your goal be to reach moderate ketones. Somewhere between the 40-80mg/dL is fine. Some children will also do fine on even lower amounts and again some on higher amounts.


If you would like help transitioning your child onto a seizure control diet please fill in my on-line intake form here.

1. Glycemic index

Glycemic index (GI) is the MOST IMPORTANT thing within a diet that has a goal of seizure control. You need to understand GI and become and expert in it because it will help you take a child that is having a hundred seizures a day to being seizure free or close to being seizure free.The glycemic index, or GI, measures how a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose. Foods are ranked based on how they compare to a reference food, this food is usually glucose, which ranks at 100. A low GI is typically any food that is ranked 55 or below.

There are 3 goals that you should focus on that, if met, can almost guarantee seizure control.

Diets for seizure control